The Rise of Nationalism and What It Means For Us

Austria Legislative elections took place on October 15, 2017: the Freedom Party had won the recent election by ten seats. At 31 years old, Sebastian Kurz had become the chancellor of Austria. This new government, which holds strong anti-immigration and Eurosceptic agendas, was founded by former Nazis in the 1950s, but today it denies any connection with Naziism. After the election, there are about 6,000 Austrian demonstrators against the new coalition. Among the banners were ones saying, “Don’t let the Nazis govern.” Examining the current global trend, what is the sub-meaning behind “the only country in Western Europe to have a far-right party in power”?

It’s clear in examining the current state of global affairs that rising nationalism is rapidly becoming a worldwide trend. This dominating political stage is demonstrated in the American election that inspired other countries all over the globe. In France, Marine Le Pen’s far-right National Front party barely lost the presidential election. Ms Le Pen was defeated by Emmanuel Macron, a liberal and strong supporter of the European Union, opposed to being a nationalist. Elsewhere, the Dutch anti-immigration Freedom Party of Geert Wilders was defeated by liberal leader Mark Rutte. Also in Germany, the nationalist and populist right Alternative for Germany (AFD) gained seats in the national parliament, where it is now the third biggest party, but is not in the frame for coalition talks. The trend that demonstrates the rising power of far-right parties within each country, this wave of nationalism within people, finally culminated in the first far-right party in power in western Europe.

The clearly rising support rate of the extreme political group in each European country is behind the increasing data reflecting the ratio of the popular vote, from the increasing extreme political victory over the trend to globalization. This is not a temperate phase of the political trend, but a global pheromone, that is, not only a critical issue that reflects what happened in the United States and Austria, but also in many countries around the world. We need to change our perspective from looking at it as a single short-term issue to a global phenomenon.

The anti-immigration movement arises from the nationalism, which in turn developed as a result of the refugee crisis. With the rise of far-right parties, the safety of the people is called into question. The right-wing stance on anti-immigration and the break from the EU and UN puts many vulnerable people in harm’s way. Without the policies that protect refugees from the Middle East who suffered from the war, these people are subject to harsh discrimination. Half of the world is under constant attack by bombing, and half of the population in this planet are at war. Without asylum, refugees undertake a much more difficult and perilous journey to be truly safe from the warzone. As the the final decision of this policy approaches, we must remember what is responsible for the increasing death of the refugees that suffered from war and died on route to potential safety, and to remember the emotional image of the little refugee boy washed-up on the beach after his life-raft capsized. How many more of these stories will result from the far-right parties’ decisions? How would they handle a major refugee population in their country? What would they do to the refugees seeking refuge? The issue is not black and white. They cannot return the people to the warzone, but they also must consider the needs of their own country. Think of the Taliban. Do we become synonymous with them if we send them back to a destroyed home in a warzone? The opposing belief is that the different cultures will clash and contribute to the country’s instability. Nevertheless, the refusal to help people in trouble should come from the hope to help improve circumstances instead of from selfishness within the people that feel violated.

When the government comes up with a policy for immigrants, they should also come up with an alternate plan for the people affected by it. Therefore, the best solution should not be to inexcusably uproot all policy and forget our original goal, but to revise the system already in place. The problems that are created by society mean that the government should put more resources and money toward making a better system that focuses on the lives of refugees in Germany and Austria. The aftermath is equally important as the event to maintain stability within a nation.

With the different goals of each country, there will be always issues, but our ability to solve them just depends on how we look at them. We cannot resolve these issues alone; we need to do it together for the wellbeing of the human race, even if this means surrendering our national pride. We need to listen to the people to create a better world for all.

Austria Legislative elections took place on October 15, 2017: the Freedom Party had won the recent election by ten seats. At 31 years old, Sebastian Kurz had become the chancellor of Austria. This new government, which holds strong anti-immigration and Eurosceptic agendas, was founded by former Nazis in the 1950s, but today it denies any connection with Naziism. After the election, there are about 6,000 Austrian demonstrators against the new coalition. Among the banners were ones saying, “Don’t let the Nazis govern.” Examining the current global trend, what is the sub-meaning behind “the only country in Western Europe to have a far-right party in power”?

It’s clear in examining the current state of global affairs that rising nationalism is rapidly becoming a worldwide trend. This dominating political stage is demonstrated in the American election that inspired other countries all over the globe. In France, Marine Le Pen’s far-right National Front party barely lost the presidential election. Ms Le Pen was defeated by Emmanuel Macron, a liberal and strong supporter of the European Union, opposed to being a nationalist. Elsewhere, the Dutch anti-immigration Freedom Party of Geert Wilders was defeated by liberal leader Mark Rutte. Also in Germany, the nationalist and populist right Alternative for Germany (AFD) gained seats in the national parliament, where it is now the third biggest party, but is not in the frame for coalition talks. The trend that demonstrates the rising power of far-right parties within each country, this wave of nationalism within people, finally culminated in the first far-right party in power in western Europe.

The clearly rising support rate of the extreme political group in each European country is behind the increasing data reflecting the ratio of the popular vote, from the increasing extreme political victory over the trend to globalization. This is not a temperate phase of the political trend, but a global pheromone, that is, not only a critical issue that reflects what happened in the United States and Austria, but also in many countries around the world. We need to change our perspective from looking at it as a single short-term issue to a global phenomenon.

The anti-immigration movement arises from the nationalism, which in turn developed as a result of the refugee crisis. With the rise of far-right parties, the safety of the people is called into question. The right-wing stance on anti-immigration and the break from the EU and UN puts many vulnerable people in harm’s way. Without the policies that protect refugees from the Middle East who suffered from the war, these people are subject to harsh discrimination. Half of the world is under constant attack by bombing, and half of the population in this planet are at war. Without asylum, refugees undertake a much more difficult and perilous journey to be truly safe from the warzone. As the the final decision of this policy approaches, we must remember what is responsible for the increasing death of the refugees that suffered from war and died on route to potential safety, and to remember the emotional image of the little refugee boy washed-up on the beach after his life-raft capsized. How many more of these stories will result from the far-right parties’ decisions? How would they handle a major refugee population in their country? What would they do to the refugees seeking refuge? The issue is not black and white. They cannot return the people to the warzone, but they also must consider the needs of their own country. Think of the Taliban. Do we become synonymous with them if we send them back to a destroyed home in a warzone? The opposing belief is that the different cultures will clash and contribute to the country’s instability. Nevertheless, the refusal to help people in trouble should come from the hope to help improve circumstances instead of from selfishness within the people that feel violated.

When the government comes up with a policy for immigrants, they should also come up with an alternate plan for the people affected by it. Therefore, the best solution should not be to inexcusably uproot all policy and forget our original goal, but to revise the system already in place. The problems that are created by society mean that the government should put more resources and money toward making a better system that focuses on the lives of refugees in Germany and Austria. The aftermath is equally important as the event to maintain stability within a nation.

With the different goals of each country, there will be always issues, but our ability to solve them just depends on how we look at them. We cannot resolve these issues alone; we need to do it together for the wellbeing of the human race, even if this means surrendering our national pride. We need to listen to the people to create a better world for all.